Love the Boutlaws? Vote now to help them win Thermoskin funding

Voting is now open for the Thermoskin Community Sports Fund!

Why is your vote important?Thermoskin

Roller Derby is a new sport and, as a result, heavily under-represented in all facets of the athletic world. Finding its roots in the feminism movement, it is a sport that encourages individual personal empowerment no matter your gender identity, sexuality, body type or skill level. No matter where you are at emotionally, mentally or physically, Western Sydney Rollers is an all-inclusive and supportive community.

Why the funds are needed

We are a self-funded league and have no major sponsors to assist with our running costs. Our women’s team is a competitve league in the B-division of women’s flat-track roller derby. Our league promotes fitness, inclusiveness and self-confidence in our members and the local community. We have been invited to attend a national competition in Adelaide (The Great Southern Slam) however many of our members are single mothers, students or have other reasons for financial hardship and will be unable to afford the costs of new equipment, uniforms, insurnce and travel costs required to partcipate in this tournament. Funding to obtain the required equipment will greatly alleviate the financial strain our representative skaters and coaches.

What’s in it for you?

Aside from the chance to help your favourite skaters to glory, you’ll be in the running to win a $200 EFTPOS gift card!

Vote now for the Boutlaws!

Deaf’n’Derby

Deaf and Derby- it sounds catchy right? Sure it does, let’s try it again Deaf’an’Derby. C’mon say it quicker. Deaf’n’Derby.

Yeah okay it doesn’t seem to matter how cool you try and make it sound, it never comes out right. Geddit it – sounds right? Ha okay, I’ll stop with the puns. Maybe…

So last time you heard from me was about a year ago – I’d been skating for about a year – and I spoke about the tribulations of playing as a deaf skater. I’ve now skated for another year, and there’s been fun, many games, there have been a couple of obstacles, and there’s been a hell of a lot more blood, sweat and tears since.

I’ve discovered some important stuff for my playing capabilities. I found that for me, personally, lane 1 is an absolute stinker. It’s the equivalent of blindfolding someone and perhaps tying an arm behind their back just for fun. Other than that track placement doesn’t seem to bother me too much.

My team and I have tried a few different ways to communicate- and in the heat of the game it turns out that signs just don’t work so well – at least not for us. What I do find works best, and strangely I imagine that it works best for those of you with full hearing too, is calm talking.

It’s decisive, it’s directional and it can be loud; but not screechy like a feral galah. This seems to work best for me. It allows my brain to interpret what needs to be done, rather than have to decipher what “OMGLANE1LANE1NO!LANE4THEJAMMERISONLANE4” means. Oh yeah it’s fun.

What has become easier is being able to tell people, “Hey yeah, I’m deaf. I might need a bit of help when it comes to this, and that.”

I’m still not good at reminding my coaches to do it though. For me, it’s an awkward conversation to have, so I hate having it. Some people who know me well know that I hate talking about being deaf. HATE IT!

Anyways, because I’ve had the conversation before, I hate the idea of having to have it again to remind my coaches that “Hey! Don’t forget you need to have ‘that’ conversation with the refs at the captains meeting.” I know it shouldn’t be a difficult thing but it’s something I’m working on.

Good news is; I’m okay with telling someone new. It seems that there is a right way for me to have that conversation, and a wrong way. The right way is a private conversation where I can just go over what I need to in relation to called penalties and being addressed in the box (not that I’m ever in there…much). The bad way is where I’m forced to announce it in front of everyone where it makes me feel…embarrassed.  No one likes to be singled out. I hate that kind of attention; coupled with the fact that I don’t want to be treated as special. I just want to know when to go to the naughty corner, and when I can leave. That’s all 🙂

Playing as a deaf skater has meant that there have been other things to work on, along with the usual learning progression but thankfully I have wonderful people in my league who have been with me every step of the way.

It’s meant that I’ve learnt that going out with a plan is so much better than winging it. I mean that sounds like common sense but seriously…a plan! Those jams where I’ve been thrown out at the last second, and I don’t know what’s happening – I don’t know what wall formation, who’s assisting, or even what lane I’m going into – can really leave me feeling lost out on the track. I’ve been told that sometimes you don’t know this stuff, you just have to react. Well, all I can say is; right now…without that, I can only do the best I can, because without being able to hear your hastily thrown instructions, quite often from 10ft away, I’ve got nothing. Absolutely nothing!

So if you’re like me, and you’re deaf and you want to strap on some skates and play some derby – do it! Yes, it’s going to take some patience. Yes, you’re going to have to speak up on what you need. You’re going to have some fun.

Buckle up kiddo – you’re going to have one hell of a ride!

Families, come and have a rocking good time at a Roller Disco this Easter

If you’ve overindulged in chocolate and hot cross buns, or want the kids to burn off some of their sugar-induced energy this Sunday, then head down to the Western Sydney Rollers’ Roller Disco in Emu Plains, from 5 – 7pm.

There will be music, games, raffles and prizes galore on the night – not to mention plenty of skating! Experienced skaters and instructors will be on hand to help anyone new to skates but the aim of the night is fun!

If you do get hungry and your sweet tooth is hankering for more, there will also be a delicious array of baked goodies available – did someone say ‘cake’?

All funds raised will help the Western Sydney Rollers’ travel team, The Boutlaws, to reach their goal of competing in Adelaide in June of this year.

Invited to compete in The Great Southern Slam (TGSS), The Boutlaws will pit their skills against teams from across Australia and New Zealand. TGSS takes places every two years and in 2014 The Boutlaws placed third in division 2.

Event details

What: Western Sydney Rollers’ Roller Disco
When: Easter Sunday, 27 March 2016, from 5 – 7pm
Where: Skatel, 120 Russell Street, Emu Plains
Cost: $15 per person or $50 for a family (includes skate hire). Please note, cash only.
Dress: Something easy to skate in, costumes are encouraged.

If you have any questions or would like some photos, please contact us.

roller skating disco Western Sydney